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caption: Andy Woodford has been a pirate for the last year. He's lived in the area for the last 20 years, but felt priced out onto a boat, where he first met Sir Thomas and pirates.
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Andy Woodford has been a pirate for the last year. He's lived in the area for the last 20 years, but felt priced out onto a boat, where he first met Sir Thomas and pirates.
Credit: KUOW / Alec Cowan

Hear it again: Seattle's hip-hop scene and Puget Sound pirates — communities that make the PNW

As we get ready to gather round the table with our families and friends, Soundside is bringing you a couple of our favorite stories about community.

Since launching the show almost a year ago, Soundside has explored some of the unique communities that form the Pacific Northwest’s identity.

Back in August, KUOW arts and culture reporter Mike Davis did a vibe check on Seattle’s hip-hop scene. He sat down with four musical giants: Stas Thee Boss, Porter Ray, JusMoni, and Larry Mizell Jr.

Carving out a music career in any city is tough – there are highs and lows. And it can be especially hard in Seattle, which these pros say isn’t the most sustainable place for Black artists.

But they’ve found support in each other.

You can listen and read the original story here

Soundside 20220829 Hiphop

On the high seas of the Puget Sound sails Sir Thomas the Pirate King, also known as Thomas Gregory.

He’s part of a group of self-described “pirates” (minus the pillaging and violence) that live on the waters of the Salish Sea.

In October, Soundside producer Alec Cowan headed to Liberty Bay, near Poulsbo.

There he met with the pirate community and learned about its struggles with gentrification, and the high cost of living.

You can listen and read the original story here

Soundside Pirates Final